Horses require specialized veterinary medical care by equine specialists. Please review the following pages for information regarding common conditions that affect horses as well as your horse's treatment options. Do not hesitate to contact your equine veterinarian with any questions.

  • Preventing Lameness: Veterinary Intervention for Ringbone

    Could your horse's lameness be caused by ringbone?

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  • The Facts about Equine Nutrition

    Is your horse getting enough nutrients?

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  • Cushing's Disease (PPID)

    Cushing’s disease (also known as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, or PPID) is the most common disease affecting the endocrine system of horses. This group of glands produces hormones that help keep the body in balance. With Cushing’s disease, an imbalance of these hormones causes several symptoms,

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  • Congential Defects and Disorders

    Horses with congenital disorders are born with physical or physiological abnormalities. These may be readily apparent, or may be diagnosed as the foal matures. Unfortunately, the list of possible congenital deformities is long. These anomalies may affect the heart, ears, eyes or skin. The autoimmune,

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  • Arthritis and Degenerative Joint Disease

    Arthritis has several names — degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis — but, whatever you call it, your horse has stiff and painful joints. This common chronic condition often affects older horses, as the cartilage around their joints deteriorates, especially around their knees, coffins, fetlocks,

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  • Angular Limb Deformities

    Many young foals have crooked hind or front legs. Lax ligaments and weak muscles usually cause this discrepancy between legs, which is often self-correcting as the horse grows. However, this deviation makes the young horses more likely to crush the cuboidal bones during exercise. If this happens, once

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  • Degenerative Problems

    Degenerative disorders are conditions that worsen over time. Some can be improved, or at least slowed, if caught early on. Here are a few common degenerative conditions that horses may face. Myelopathy Myelopathy is also called wobbler syndrome because of the affected horse’s unstable gait. This condition

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  • Deworming and Internal Parasites

    Like any animal, horses are susceptible to a wide range of parasites. Of the approximately 150 species of internal equine parasites, some can cause serious harm while others are more of an annoyance. Usually parasite eggs or larvae arrive on the ground from the manure of infected horses. Another horse

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  • Diagnostic Imaging

    Diagnostic imaging allows veterinarians to see inside a horse’s body without the need for surgery. X-rays are probably the best-known type of diagnostic imaging, but many others are available to help diagnose illnesses and other health problems in horses. Each type of diagnostic imaging has its own

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  • Arthritis in Horses

    Arthritis is one of the most common conditions causing lameness in older horses; in fact, arthritis is responsible for up to 60 percent of all lameness. Arthritis can affect the knee, joint, fetlock, coffin and hock. Arthritis that affects the pastern is also known as “ringbone.” Arthritis is the

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  • Thyroid Problems

    The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system and consists of two lobes located on the front of a horse’s neck. This gland produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism and affect most of the body’s tissues. When functioning normally, the thyroid is not visible, but certain diseases

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  • Ringbone

    Ringbone is a lameness condition that affects the pastern and coffin joints in horses. This is a degenerative disease that continues to worsen over time. The right treatment and ongoing management, though, can slow the progression of the condition. Types of Ringbone Ringbone causes an enlargement around

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  • Nutrition

    You can divide horse nutrition into six categories: carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. If you get the right feed for your horse, it might take care of the first five. Supplement the feed with plenty of water, and your horse should have all of its needs met. However, to be sure

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  • Metabolism

    Metabolism in horses — and in other animals — refers to all the body’s complicated processes that break down food, drink and drugs to provide nutrients and energy for living. Anabolic reactions generally happen soon after eating, to build structural parts of the body, such as muscles. Catabolic

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  • Limb Conditions

    Several disorders can affect the hindlimbs, forelimbs or hooves of horses. Some of these can lead to lameness or changes in gait. Hindlimb Conditions in Horses Stringhalt is a condition that causes the horse to jerk or hop, with the hind legs pulled up high before taking the next step. This results

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  • Ligament and Tendon Injuries

    Ligaments and tendons are important parts of the musculoskeletal system, which also includes the muscles and bones. Together, all these components provide support for the body and enable the horse to move and exercise. Tendons are very tough bands of connective tissue that connect muscles to bone. Tendons

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  • Hoof Health and Care

    Horse hooves are complex structures that tell you a lot about your horse’s health and wellbeing. They’re also susceptible to many problems. Here are a few hoof basics as well as some of the major hoof issues your horse faces. Anatomy If you look at the bottom of a horse’s hoof, you’ll see two

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  • Fractures

    Fractures, or breaks, can potentially occur in any bone in a horse’s body. Some types of fractures, however, are more common, especially among very athletic horses, such as racehorses. Causes of Fractures Fractures fall into several categories: An incomplete fracture (also known a “green stick,”

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